HCF Is Vested In The Battle Of Camden Site and City Of Camden Visitors Center

By Virginia Zemp

Executive Director – Historic Camden

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE: We mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor…

HCF IS VESTED IN THE BATTLE OF CAMDEN SITE and CITY OF CAMDEN VISITORS CENTER

Doug Bostick is the Executive Director of the South Carolina Battleground Trust. He has worked for 25+ years to mark, preserve and interpret South Carolina’s hallowed grounds reflecting battles fought in both the American Civil War and the American Revolutionary War. Historic Camden Foundation caught up with Doug on the Liberty Trail during their newly announced Battle of Hanging Rock initiative.

  • Your work on the SC Revolutionary War battlegrounds has moved into a new, exciting and accessible phase for the Liberty Trail- How will the technology help engage visitors?

DB: The South Carolina Liberty Trail will utilize technology in a variety of ways. First, on the battlefields itself, we will utilize on-site interpretive signage such as the signs that currently mark the Battle of Hobkirk’s Hill. Additionally, on-site interpretation will be enhanced by cutting-edge digital offering. Some battlefields will include augmented reality interpretations where visitors can “see” the battle. Other battlefields will use GPS-triggered beacons to offer audio presentations of the personal stories of combatants.

All of the sites on the Liberty Trail will be connected by an engaging interactive mobile tour APP that will connect all of our battlefields. The APP will offer driving directions, itinerary-building features, dining and lodging options, and recommend other nearby historic sites, recreational and cultural activities.

2) I am fascinated with the archaeology and science behind your research on these sites- Tell us about your comparison of historical maps to current conditions?

DB: Historic maps are very helpful in our research, but we augment these resources with modern technology that allows us to confirm the maps and, in some cases, correct the maps. Battlefield archaeology allows us to confirm the battlefield footprint and even determine where each army stood or advanced by where they were shooting. Other artifacts allow us to confirm or document the various regiments that were engaged.

LiDAR is a near infrared light technology that provides us with a great look at the raw topography of the land unencumbered by trees and underbrush. These surveys allow us to spot historic roadbeds and see geographic features often written about in contemporary battlefield reports.

GZ: There are so many discoveries to be found all over the state. Thank you for educating us in the possibilities.

3) The Battle of Camden site preservation started in 1909 by the DAR with the placement of the DeKalb Monument. The opportunities SCBT and ABT have invested with Historic Camden’s 700 acres will give an in-depth look at this turning point in the Revolutionary War-  Give us a glimpse of some of the panel stories.

DB: In a broad view, Camden was a devastating defeat for the Patriot cause, but the response to this loss created an important turning point in the war. Patriots lost many good men in this battle, but none were more keenly felt than the loss of Baron de Kalb. The upcoming battlefield interpretation will, in part, focus on his service to the cause of Liberty. Additionally, we have focused much of our time in documenting the stories of individual participants, both Patriot and British, in the battle. Traditionally, battle interpretation focuses on the officers and commanders. While we will certainly interpret the decision-makers, we are also readily focusing on the junior officers, the sergeants, the privates, and the militia that served on both sides. There is a wealth of personal stories related to the Battle of Camden that has survived.

4) The new Visitors Center on Broad Street will guide visitors to the battle site and add engagement of the Revolutionary War Southern Campaign. How will this new exhibit interface with the statewide Liberty Trail as well as encourage tourism in Kershaw County?

DB: The new Visitors Center will serve as a Gateway to not only the Battle of Camden and the Battle of Hobkirk’s Hill, but to the entire Liberty Trail. We are working on a key exhibit within the Center that will propel visitors to visit the battlefield itself. Once they visit the battlefield site, an effective combination of traditional interpretive signage and stories delivered through new technologies will provide visitors with a stimulating and engaging experience.

GZ: The Kershaw Cornwallis House and grounds have their own unique story to tell with regard to colonial trade and Rev War military strategy.  HCF looks forward to engaging the importance of our location’s impact on the story of Kershaw County.

5) The stories of those who fought and died in Camden are integral to the South Carolina Revolutionary War story and the national story of independence. How will our collaborative efforts get these stories out for the 250th Anniversary?

DB: We are focusing on a broad cross-section of stories of the people tied to this battle … a British sergeant in the 23rd Regiment of Foot who was captured by General Gates’ men at Saratoga, escaped, and then faced Gates again at Camden with much different results. We will tell the stories of multiple African-American soldiers in the North Carolina militia; the stories of women driving the wagons in the Quartermaster corps; soldiers who lost their lives in the battle and others who were captured and served long terms as prisoners-of-war in brutal conditions. There is also a little understood story of Americans fighting Americans. Many of the “British” troops at the Battle of Camden were actually American-born Provincial soldiers choosing to fight for the King.

GZ: HCF has added a visual display of flags of the 13 colonies, flying at the front entranceway to the main office.  This display is to remind passersby that the 7000 individuals who stood on that hallowed ground on August 16, 1780 came from all over the colonies and the world. Some fought as loyalists, some as patriots, many didn’t fight but attended to their troops. Their stories are intertwined forever in the American story of liberty.

GZ: Thank you Doug, the SC Battleground Trust and the American Battlefield Trust for celebrating our extraordinary story with us!

Recollections Add Depth To History

By Virginia Zemp

Executive Director – Historic Camden

RECOLLECTIONS ADD DEPTH TO HISTORY

Scholars study archival records to develop the history of an event or place.  In South Carolina, we are fortunate to have saved, preserved and made accessible an immense number of records- government, corporate and personal! These records provide details which ultimately are reviewed in new light as each generation considers their impact on current discussions.

Repositories like Camden Archives and Museum; SC Archives and History Department; The South Caroliniana Library; SC Historical Society, continue to protect our Revolutionary War veteran stories. These papers and letters are the basis for Historic Camden’s exhibits and are integral to the building of a narrative for the Battle of Camden site.

Thomas Pinckney, injured at the Battle of Camden wrote the following:

I will first notice; which is that the movement in the night of 15th of August was not made with the intention of attacking the enemy, but for the purpose of occupying a strong position so near him as to confine his operations, to cut off his supplies of Provisions, from the upper parts of the Wateree & Pedee
Rivers, & to harass him with detachments of light Troops, & to oblige him either to retreat or to come out & attack us upon our own ground, in a situation where the Militia which constituted our principal numerical force, might act to the best advantage.
THOMAS PINCKNEY LETTER TO WILLIAM JOHNSON; SC Historical Magazine, Vol. X, No. 8 (August 1886), pp. 244-253.

Published materials and transcribed records form a pathway to discover individual stories. The palisade wall surrounding the town in 1780 as well as the redoubt positions were detailed in records of the Continental Congress.  Archaeology studies verified the accuracy of this drawing.

IMAGE: Plan of Camden, May 12, 1781, adapted from the Nathaniel Greene Papers, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives, Washington DC- additionally showing HCF properties in 2018..

Thank You to these important institutions and their resources for helping Historic Camden Foundation tell the unique story of Kershaw County.

Resources of quality information are discoverable through published books and treatises as well as internet sources. www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/ has compiled information on The Camden District Regiment of Militia, established February 1775, noting Commanders, Miscellaneous Players and Known Privates.  You can discover a synopsis of where and when they fought.

 

The Camden District Regiment of Militia

Month & Year Established: February 1775

Commanders: Col. Richard Richardson, Col. Joseph Kershaw,

Col. Thomas Taylor

Misc. Players: Jacob Bethany – Commissary

Jesse Goodwyn – Commissary

John Hamilton – Commissary

William Meyers – Asst. Commissary

Isaac Raiford – Comm. General

Timothy Rives – Commissary

Henry Sanders – Commissary

John Wyche – Asst. Commissary

Today’s Veteran recollections are being saved!

Under the same premise that individual stories are imperative to a better understanding of history, the United States Congress created the Veterans History Project (VHP) in 2000 as part of the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress. VHP collects, preserves and makes accessible the firsthand remembrances of U.S. military veterans from World War I through the more recent conflicts.

Beginning in February, Historic Camden Foundation will collaborate with the National Society of the Colonial Dames in South Carolina (NSCDSC) and VHP to begin taking oral histories of our local veterans.  The NSCDSC will provide volunteers to video the discussions and coordinate the proper methods for Library of Congress inclusion.  Historic Camden Foundation is proud to support this effort on its site. For further information, please contact Virginia Zemp at 803-432-9841.

Camden Militia 1775- Known Privates / Fifers / Drummers / Etc. – Captain Unknown:  Andrew Allison; Edward Andrews; George Antse; John Armstrong- Wagon Master William Ashley;

John Baker; John Barnet; Andrew Barnett; Andrew Baskin; Ulrick Beard; Benedict Best; John Blake; William Boyd; Joseph Bradley; William Brewer; David Brown; Isaac Busby; Jasper Bush;

Greenberry Caps; Henry Cato; Reuben Cook; Robert Cook; Adam Coon; Lewis Coon; Lot Cornelius; John Countryman; Abiah Croft; Godfrey Cromer; Jacob Cromer; William Croskry; Peter Curry;

Henry Dancer; William Daniel; George Davidson; Joseph Davies; Reynolds Dill; Robert Duke;Samuel Dunlap;

Henry Eady; John Elder; Matthias Elmore; Josiah Evans; Caspar Faust, Jr.; John Faust; Richard Featherston; Casper Foust; Casper Foust, Jr.; William Foust; John Funderbuck;

Thomas Gaston; James Gibson; John Gillespie; John Glazier; Howell Goodwyn; Jesse Goodwyn;  William Goodwyn;

Henry Hagood; Lewis Hagood; John Hamilton; Adam Hamiter; John Harbirt; Victor Harris; John Harvison; Arthur Hicklin; John Hicklin; William Hirons; Thomas Hodge; Archibald Hood; James Hood; Daniel Horton; Henry Horton; John Horton; James Howard; Arthur Howell; Matthew Howell; William Howell;  James Hoy;

John Ingram; William Ingram; John Jackson; Barnet Johnston; David Johnston; John Jones; Samuel Jones;

Peter Kelly; David Kennedy; John Kennington; John Killingsworth; Berry King; George King; John King -Wagoner Christian Kinsler; William Kirkland; Zachariah Kirkland; Robert Kirkpatrick;

John Lake; Titus Lang; Nicholas Latner; Samuel Littlejohn;

Robert Marshall; Patrick McDonald; Peter McGrew; Wright McLemore; Thomas McMeans; George McWhorter; Buckner Miles; William Miller; Daniel Monaghan; John Jett Mothershead; Michael Muckenfuss; John Murff; David Myars;

Edward Narramore; John Nealins; William Nealins; William Nettles; John Nisbett; William Nisbett; William Norris – Wagoner; William Owens; John Parr; James Pearson; Noah Phelps; Barnaby McKinney Pope;

Dennis Quinlin; Charle Raley, Jr.; Henry Rivers; Green Rives; Henry Rives; John Rives; William Rives; Thomas Roach; William Robertson; Nicholas Robinson – Wagoner; Hugh Rodgers; William Rolleson – Wagoner; Moses Ross;

John Salisbury; Pettigrew Salisbury; Andrew Sanders; Samuel Sealy;  Howell Sellers; George Smith; Stephen Smith; John Snelling; Charles Spradley; Reuben Starke; Kemp T. Strother;

John Taylor; Jacob Theus; Williamson Threewits; Jesse Tillman; John Trusdale; Jacob Turnipseed;  John Turnipseed;

Jonathan Welsh; William Welsh; Joseph West; Nathan White; Joseph Whitener – Express Rider; Edward Williams – Express Rider; John Williams; Rednal Williams; Rolling Williamson; Robert Willis; Thomas Wise; Drury Wyche; John Wyche;  George Yarborough; Lewis Yarborough; William Yarboro.

Historic Camden: 50 years of Preservation, Education and Celebration!

By Lance Player

Staff Member – Historic Camden

Pictured (1975): Richard Lloyd (seated) Hope Cooper (seated) Henry Boykin

We are happy to introduce to you our new blog, which will discuss a variety of topics and helps us usher into a new era as we celebrate fifty years of preservation, education and celebration.

For fifty years Historic Camden has played a vital role in preserving Kershaw County’s storied history. Our journey began in 1966 when the Kershaw County Chamber of Commerce, along with a group of local residents, proposed a new initiative. That initiative, along with seed money given by Richard and Margaret Lloyd, helped to establish what would become the Historic Camden Foundation. On the first weekend of November, in 1970, Historic Camden opened its doors to visitors. That very same weekend marked the first annual Revolutionary War Field Days, a reenactment held each year since. Historic Camden was one of the first major preservation projects for the county, helping to pave the way for future efforts as well.

Early Revolutionary War Field Days with the rebuilt Kershaw Cornwallis House in the background

While five decades may have passed, one thing that has remained true is Historic Camden’s steadfast dedication to its mission statement: to protect, preserve and celebrate Camden’s extraordinary Colonial and Revolutionary War history. Historic Camden is a proud member of the community, but we are always working to expand our audience. Each year we receive visitors from not just Camden, but all throughout the United States as well as countries around the world. As part of our mission, we place a great deal of our focus on three key areas: preservation, education and events. Our preservation efforts include things such as maintaining/restoration of our buildings, collections and the Camden Battlefield and Longleaf Pine Preserve. In terms of education, we offer guided tours, lectures, school tours and our annual History Days program. Events are a regular occurrence and come in a variety of forms including Treaty of Ghent, Revel, Haunts and Spirits and Revolutionary War Field Days. As a private, non-profit organization we also look to some of our events as fundraisers. This helps us to continue with our preservation and education efforts and provide visitors with opportunities to gain their very own experiences.

Historic Camden’s early welcome sign

Historic Camden is a community staple, and we like to maintain an open invitation mentality, so that each of you have the opportunity to get involved. Whether you choose to volunteer, become a member, take a tour or make a donation, your support is crucial and always appreciated. Historic Camden is ever-growing with our established efforts and new opportunities on the horizon. With the arrival of 2020 we begin a year of celebration 50 years in the making, and we’re happy to invite you all to celebrate with us!